The Disaster Management Session at the Canadian Association for Conservation Conference

The 41st Annual Canadian Association for Conservation Conference was held in Edmonton, Alberta from May 28-30, 2015. The Lead Conservator attended the entire conference and the Lead Archivist attended the final day of the conference.

Amanda Oliver, Lead Archivist, presenting at the CAC conference. Photo Credit: Yesan Ham

Amanda Oliver, Lead Archivist, presenting at the CAC conference. Photo Credit: Yesan Ham

On May 30, the conference hosted a session entitled ‘Disaster Management’. The session began with a paper by Sue Warren called, ‘Canada Science and Technology Museum – Crisis Management’. She discussed the difficulties she experienced with her institution’s facility, where high levels of airborne mould were found as a result of multiple leaks in their roof. Warren shared her experience dealing with an abrupt closure and mass conservation treatments of artefacts from the museum.

Next, Sarah Little, Rebecca Delorme and Sarah Storck presented a paper entitled, ‘Staying Afloat: The Challengers of Recovering from a Major Flood at a Small Museum”. The speakers shared their experience recovering museum artefacts from the June 2013 in southern Alberta. They went into great detail discussing the time and organizational skills required to complete recovery work.

Emily Turgeon-Brunet, Lead Conservator, presenting at the CAC conference. Photo Credit: Yesan Ham

Emily Turgeon-Brunet, Lead Conservator, presenting at the CAC conference. Photo Credit: Yesan Ham

In addition to this presentation about Museum of the Highwood, Gail Niinimaa and Irene Karsten presented a paper called, ‘Salvage and Recovery at Museum of the Highwood Artifacts after Major Flooding’. The presenters discussed their experience salvaging material immediately after the flooding, with a particular focus on the museum’s textile collection. It was wonderful to hear these presentations about an ASA institutional member, especially considering ASA has been working exclusively on the Museum of the Highwood’s archival material. It was interesting to learn more about their recovery work with the museum’s artefacts.

The Lead Team presented the final paper of the session entitled, ‘Worst Case Scenario: Preparing Alberta’s Archives for Future Disasters’. This presentation summarized the ASA’s Flood Advisory Programme – our work so far and our plans for the future. We used specific examples for our members that were negatively affected by the flood and how our program has assisted in their recovery work.

The Lead Team learnt a great deal throughout the conference and especially during the Disaster Management Session. We would like to thank the Canadian Association for Conservation for inviting us to present at the conference. It was a wonderful experience!

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The Lead Team Presents…

From May 13th to 15th the Lead Conservator presented a poster in Miami, Florida at the 43rd annual AIC (American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works) conference, on behalf of the Lead Team. The poster was exhibited for three days of the conference. On the final exhibition day the Lead Conservator was available to answer questions and accept feedback from viewers.
The conference was a wonderful experience where the Lead Conservator was able to meet representatives from many companies who sell archival housing materials, technical literature, conservation supplies, exhibition cases and mounts, instruments of analysis, and environmental monitoring systems. She also attended 20 sessions, two networking receptions, one networking luncheon, and a tour of the Vizcaya Museum and Gardens.

The Lead Team’s poster at the AIC conference  Photo Credit: Emily Turgeon-Brunet

The Lead Team’s poster at the AIC conference
Photo Credit: Emily Turgeon-Brunet

Decorative breakwater at the Vizcaya Museum and Gardens  Photo Credit: Emily Turgeon-Brunet

Decorative breakwater at the Vizcaya Museum and Gardens
Photo Credit: Emily Turgeon-Brunet

artdeco

Art Deco building in South Beach, near the Miami Design Preservation League Photo Credit: Emily Turgeon-Brunet

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Happy International Archives Day!

June 9 is International Archives Day! International Archives Day was established in November 2007 by the International Council on Archives. The date was chosen because the International Council on Archives (ICA) was founded on June 9, 1948 under the patronage of the UNESCO. It is a day to celebrate our archival institutions around the world. ICA states that, “through the International Archives Day, we can:

  • Raise awareness among the public of the importance of records and archives, in order to make it understood that records and archives provide the foundation for their rights and identity;
  • Raise the awareness of senior decision makers of the benefits of records management for good governance and development;
  • Raise the public, private and public sectors’ awareness of the necessity of preserving archives for the long-term, and of providing access to them;
  • Promote and bring to the attention of the larger public unique, extraordinary and rare documents preserved in archival institutions;
  • Improve the image of records and archives and enhance their visibility globally.”[1]

These are great reasons to partake in International Archives Day! Although ASA is not an archives, we support the work of archives and archivists across Alberta and represent Alberta’s archival community. We would like to take this opportunity to recognize all of the work our institutional and individual members do every day to acquire, preserve and make assessable Alberta’s documentary heritage. We hope you have a wonderful International Archives Day!

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[1] International Council on Archives, “International Archives Day,” http://www.ica.org/1561/international-archives-day/celebrate-the-international-archives-day.html

Salvage at a Glance

Since September 2014, the Flood Advisory Programme’s Lead Team has been working with our institutional members on salvage and recovery from the June 2013 floods. We had the opportunity to treat records from the Museum of the Highwood, which was devastated by the flood. The Lead Team transported the frozen photographic material to the Provincial Archives of Alberta’s conservation lab to treat the records and to begin reconciling the records with their descriptions. Here are a few photographs of this process:

Emily Turgeon-Brunet handling muddy matted photographs. Photo Credit: Yesan Ham.

Emily Turgeon-Brunet handling muddy matted photographs. Photo Credit: Yesan Ham.

Glass plate negatives on a drying rack after multiple baths in a mixture of ethanol and water. Photo Credit: Amanda Oliver.

Glass plate negatives on a drying rack after multiple baths in a mixture of ethanol and water. Photo Credit: Amanda Oliver.

Broken glass plate negative on a light table. Photo Credit: Yesan Ham.

Broken glass plate negative on a light table. Photo Credit: Yesan Ham.

Before treatment: six mud-covered ambrotypes in wooden box. Photo Credit: Yesan Ham.

Before treatment: six mud-covered ambrotypes in wooden box. Photo Credit: Yesan Ham.

After treatment: six ambrotypes properly rehoused. Photo Credit: Yesan Ham.

After treatment: six ambrotypes properly rehoused. Photo Credit: Yesan Ham.

Drying photographs after they have been treated. Photo Credit: Amanda Oliver.

Drying photographs after they have been treated. Photo Credit: Amanda Oliver.

We are continuing to work with Museum of the Highwood to salvage their archival records and make their collection accessible again. We would like to thank the Museum of the Highwood for allowing us to share these photographs, Yesan Ham for taking the photographs and the Provincial Archives of Alberta for providing us with the lab space to treat the records.

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Absorbent Socks

Absorbent socks, or absorbent snakes, are a great resource to have on hand in case of a small scale water emergency in your facility. The socks can be used to block incoming water, which may give you time turn off the water source (if possible) or move nearby records. The socks absorb water, subsequently creating a barrier between the water source and your holdings. They can be wrung out, dried and reused.

The socks come in a variety of lengths and grades. Be sure to purchase the universal grade as the universal grade absorbs water. Other grades are available for oil or chemical spills and these grades will not be as effective for water. This product is available at most industrial safety equipment retailers. We recommend having an absorbent sock in your emergency response kit for small scale water emergencies, such as burst pipes or water heater leaks.

**ASA does not endorse the use of any particular brand of absorbent sock.
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MayDay!

May 1 is Mayday – a day to reflect on, plan and/or practice disaster response and recovery plans and techniques. The purpose of MayDay is to focus on disaster preparedness for one day every year. Any form of preparedness helps if a disaster occurs. MayDay is an opportunity to update a disaster plan, practice emergency procedures, provide training (fire drills, evacuations, fire extinguisher use, etc.), update contact lists, and review storage facilities. These are just a few examples of activities for MayDay. Get creative and find an activity that is right for your facility, staff and collection.

       May Day Resources:

Suggested MayDay Activities

MayDay Quick Tips

MayDay falls within Preservation Week

MayDay Resources

Tips from MayDay2014

       Disaster Related Webinars on May 1, 2015

Disaster Response Q&A (free)

After Disasters: Salvage and Recovery in Small to Mid-Sized Museums and Libraries (free)

The Supercharged Management System: Applying the Incident Command System in Cultural Repositories (free, pre-recorded)

Preparation makes a difference. Do one thing on May 1, 2015 to prepare your institution for a disaster. Join the MayDay movement to protect our archives and our heritage!

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ASA’s Archives Institute

The Archives Society of Alberta (ASA) offers a 6-day intensive course providing an introduction to the fundamental principles and tasks undertaken by the archival profession. Topics include acquisition, accessioning, appraisal, arrangement, description, preservation, conservation, and disaster planning, among others. The course is taught by experienced ASA staff members as well as guest lecturers. Participants receive an Archives Institute certificate from the ASA upon completion of the course and take home exercise. The course is perfect for those working in or managing archival institutions with no previous education or training.

This year’s Archives Institute will be held May 4-9 in Calgary. The deadline to register is April 17, 2015. For more details, please visit our website.

We hope to see you at the Archives Institute!

April Showers bring Spring Emergencies

With spring fast approaching (finally!), archives must ensure they are prepared for any disasters caused by the change in the weather. Monitor surface runoff water, or overland flow, near your facility. Overland flow happens when water from meltwater or precipitation flows over the ground. This is caused by heavy precipitation and/or soil saturation. Check the Alberta Flood Map Application to see if your facility is located on or near overland flow areas.

River flows and levels can also fluctuate during this time of year. Become familiar with which water basin your facility is located in and monitor flow rates and water levels in your area.

louise_bridge

The Louise Bridge during the Spring Flood of 1915. CCG-3034, City of Calgary, Corporate Records, Archives. http://www.albertaonrecord.ca/is-ccg-3034

Check eavestroughs and drainage around your building for debris that may have accumulated over the winter. Debris, such as leaves or litter, may prevent water from being redirected from your facility and may cause water to enter your building.

Thunderstorms are also common during this time of year and may affect the electricity in your building. Power surges can cause data errors and loss of memory in computers and damage other electronic devices. Surge bars divert excess electrical energy from your electronic devices to prevent any damage. Ensure your facility utilizes surge bars for all of your electronic devices.

Do you have any advice on how archives can prepare for spring weather? Let us know in the comments!

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Business Continuity Awareness Week

bcawThis coming week (March 16-20) is Business Continuity Awareness Week! Business continuity planning is an important part of emergency planning as it focuses on how to resume vital services quickly in the event of an emergency. The theme for this week is exercising and testing plans. The Business Continuity Institute’s (BCI) awareness week includes some interesting events and resources that may be of interest to archival institutions:

BCI is an international organization established in 1994 to support individuals and organizations with business continuity through resources and certification programs. Their Business Continuity Awareness Week is a great opportunity for archival institutions to review and test their business continuity plan!

http://www.thebci.org/BCAWposters/US%20Letter_fire.pdf

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Project by the Numbers

ASA’s Flood Advisory Programme is six months into its two year project! This is some of the work we have completed so far:

  • Travelled 3834 kilometres
  • Treated 625 items
  • Conducted 10 site assessments
  • Created 10 work plans
  • Placed 9 supply orders
  • Posted 8 blog entries
  • Created 5 online resources (ASA’s Flood Assistance Page)
  • Wrote 4 condition reports
  • Hired 3 contractors to complete work at heavily impacted sites
  • Attended 3 archives week events
  • Filmed 3 how-to videos
  • Attended 3 webinars
  • Wrote 2 newsletter articles
  • Wrote 2 board reports
  • Hosted 1 expert from CCI to advise on the treatment of damaged records
  • Attended 1 workshop

We are looking forward to the next 18 months!

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