Monthly Archives: May 2015

Salvage at a Glance

Since September 2014, the Flood Advisory Programme’s Lead Team has been working with our institutional members on salvage and recovery from the June 2013 floods. We had the opportunity to treat records from the Museum of the Highwood, which was devastated by the flood. The Lead Team transported the frozen photographic material to the Provincial Archives of Alberta’s conservation lab to treat the records and to begin reconciling the records with their descriptions. Here are a few photographs of this process:

Emily Turgeon-Brunet handling muddy matted photographs. Photo Credit: Yesan Ham.

Emily Turgeon-Brunet handling muddy matted photographs. Photo Credit: Yesan Ham.

Glass plate negatives on a drying rack after multiple baths in a mixture of ethanol and water. Photo Credit: Amanda Oliver.

Glass plate negatives on a drying rack after multiple baths in a mixture of ethanol and water. Photo Credit: Amanda Oliver.

Broken glass plate negative on a light table. Photo Credit: Yesan Ham.

Broken glass plate negative on a light table. Photo Credit: Yesan Ham.

Before treatment: six mud-covered ambrotypes in wooden box. Photo Credit: Yesan Ham.

Before treatment: six mud-covered ambrotypes in wooden box. Photo Credit: Yesan Ham.

After treatment: six ambrotypes properly rehoused. Photo Credit: Yesan Ham.

After treatment: six ambrotypes properly rehoused. Photo Credit: Yesan Ham.

Drying photographs after they have been treated. Photo Credit: Amanda Oliver.

Drying photographs after they have been treated. Photo Credit: Amanda Oliver.

We are continuing to work with Museum of the Highwood to salvage their archival records and make their collection accessible again. We would like to thank the Museum of the Highwood for allowing us to share these photographs, Yesan Ham for taking the photographs and the Provincial Archives of Alberta for providing us with the lab space to treat the records.

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Absorbent Socks

Absorbent socks, or absorbent snakes, are a great resource to have on hand in case of a small scale water emergency in your facility. The socks can be used to block incoming water, which may give you time turn off the water source (if possible) or move nearby records. The socks absorb water, subsequently creating a barrier between the water source and your holdings. They can be wrung out, dried and reused.

The socks come in a variety of lengths and grades. Be sure to purchase the universal grade as the universal grade absorbs water. Other grades are available for oil or chemical spills and these grades will not be as effective for water. This product is available at most industrial safety equipment retailers. We recommend having an absorbent sock in your emergency response kit for small scale water emergencies, such as burst pipes or water heater leaks.

**ASA does not endorse the use of any particular brand of absorbent sock.
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